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Conservation and Hope at the Lausanne Younger Leaders Gathering

Ben Lowe

This piece was originally published on the A Rocha International Planetwise blog on August 31st, 2016.

This August, over 1,000 young Christian delegates from more than 140 countries convened outside Jakarta, Indonesia, for the 2016 Lausanne Younger Leaders Gathering (YLG). My colleague Rachel Lamb and I were there representing Young Evangelicals for Climate Action along with the broader creation care community we’re part of, including A Rocha and the Au Sable Institute.

A once-in-a-generation event, the theme of this YLG was ‘United in the Great Story’, and the program built on the rich heritage of the Lausanne Movement with its stated vision of ‘the whole church, bringing the whole gospel, to the whole world.’ This included an intentional focus on the role of creation care in integral mission today. As Lausanne articulated in its seminal statement arising from the Third Congress on World Evangelization in 2010, The Cape Town Commitment:

‘The Bible declares God’s redemptive purpose for creation itself. Integral mission means discerning, proclaiming, and living out the biblical truth that the gospel is God’s good news, through the cross and resurrection of Jesus Christ, for individual persons, and for society, and for creation. All three are broken and suffering because of sin; all three are included in the redeeming love and mission of God; all three must be part of the comprehensive mission of God’s people.’ (Part 1, Section 7).

In Jakarta, this commitment was further strengthened by a younger generation of leaders who engaged with creation care themes through worship, bible exposition, drama presentations, workshops, and a keynote address given by Marina Silva, a friend of A Rocha and former Senator and Minister of the Environment from Brazil.

A Rocha was well represented and it was great to hear from folks across our international family, including staff, trustees, and numerous friends who have been involved with or blessed by A Rocha in various ways and places. Here are some of their reflections:

‘From the beginning God created us in His own image and commanded us to rule over his creation; such great power in our hands that comes with great responsibility. Personally, I will take this responsibility to the next level by initiating a creation care learning community for children where I live in Sumatra, Indonesia. Having yet another generation to care for creation is a breath of fresh air for my country and also the world. It’s a long, long way to go, but being at YLG I know that I always have God and his global church backing me up!’ – Christine Kaharmen, Delegate from Indonesia

‘The reaction received during the YLG, especially after Marina Silva’s presentation on creation care, confirmed to me that I am doing important work for the Lord that must continue. Prior to this, whenever I introduced myself to people and told them what I do I could almost sense their bewilderment – very few understood the concept of creation care. In Africa, with issues of hunger and poverty, the connection between our livelihood/existence and the state of the earth is often not clearly identified. As such, we – people and the earth – both suffer. Creation care is so important especially when we understand that our existence is based on it. The beauty of the world is astounding – just look around! Why would I not want to do everything and anything I could to protect it? He who I love more than anything else gave it to me as a gift, and the least I can do is to honor and protect this gift and encourage others to do the same.’ – Talitha Takura Pam, Coordinator of Eden Creation Care Initiative, an A Rocha Associated Project in Nigeria

‘YLG 2016 was a life-impacting gathering which I am honored to be part of … My heart is full of expectation of what God will do in the years to come.’ – Rodolpho Simas, Chair of A Rocha Brazil

‘One of the encouraging things was to witness over 1,000 leaders under the age of 35 from every continent, in sober reflection on the state of the world, connecting with each other, and making a fresh, passionate commitment to global mission.’ – Las Newman, Lausanne Associate Director

‘This new generation shows an appreciation for this task and its importance that we don’t usually see in their elders … We look forward to this continuing through YLGen, Lausanne’s 10 year follow-up program, and we’re already working to that end.’ – Ed Brown, Lausanne Creation Care Catalyst

L-R in back: Las Newman, Ed Brown, Carlos Vicente, Rodolpho Simas, Ben Lowe; L-R in front: Christine Kaharmen, Karen Yan, Talitha Takura Pam (behind Karen), Andrea Ramos Santos, Rachel Lamb

L-R in back: Las Newman, Ed Brown, Carlos Vicente, Rodolpho Simas, Ben Lowe; L-R in front: Christine Kaharmen, Karen Yan, Talitha Takura Pam (behind Karen), Andrea Ramos Santos, Rachel Lamb

I, too, am deeply grateful for my time at the gathering. I’m moving on from almost a decade of full-time creation care activism and advocacy into graduate studies in tropical conservation and development at the University of Florida. To be honest, I was unsure about whether participating in another conference (and a 7-day one at that!) was a good use of limited time. It was.

Personally, God used YLG to help launch me into this new season of life, re-centered on Christ, refocused on God’s story, and reconnected in the global body.

Collectively, God used YLG to renew and unite us as leaders in the great and global story of redemption, reconciliation, and restoration that we all get to be part of together. It was a rich and transformative time − precious relationships were formed, powerful ideas were discussed, and prayerful commitments were made − but only time will truly show the fruit of all the seeds sown.

For now, I’m grateful for Lausanne’s significant and deepening focus on creation care in the Church around the world. And I am filled with hope that God will continue to use the Lausanne Movement, and all who were at YLG, to share and show his great redemptive love to the very ends of the good but groaning earth.

On Rolling Off the Au Sable Institute Board

Ben Lowe

From the Au Sable Institute's news page (August 19, 2016):

It is bittersweet that Au Sable bid ‘adieu’ to Ben Lowe, Chair of Au Sable’s Board of Trustees in June of this year of 2016. For the past 6 years, Ben has been a valued trustee on Au Sable’s Board, the final five serving as its Chair. During that time, Ben has provided outstanding leadership, Christian example, and personal inspiration to the Trustees and to Au Sable. For this, the Institute is truly grateful.

Born and Raised in Singapore as part of a missionary family, early in life Ben came face to face with the harsh realities of pollution and poverty. Witnessing these things, Ben grew to have a passion for activism and advocacy for the environment, combined with his pastoral concern for God’s people and the care of God’s creation. Co-Founder of Renewal, an organization to organize college students in caring for creation, Ben went on to form Young Evangelicals for Climate Action (YECA), today recognized as one of the most respected and influential Christian voices on the issue of climate change. With these and other experiences, Ben came to Au Sable’s Board of Trustees with a reputation for making a difference, and for making differences that mattered.

Ben earned a B.S. in Environmental Biology from Wheaton College (IL) in 2007, and since then has been involved in various projects of environmental activism. The author of three books, Green Revolution (2009), Doing Good Without Giving Up (2014) and most recently in 2016, The Future of our Faith: An Intergenerational Conversation on Critical Issues Facing the Church which Ben co-authored with Ron Sider, Ben also found time and energy to become ordained as a pastor in the Christian and Missionary Alliance Church. Now Ben is returning to the world of academia, where he will begin this fall, a Masters program at the University of Florida in Interdisciplinary Ecology in their School of Natural Resources and Environment.  "I'm delighted that Ben will be joining my research group at the University of Florida. His broad background and expertise will be a great addition, and his research in Africa will make an excellent contibution to conservation," says Ben's advisor Dr. Susan Jacobson, UF Distinguished Teaching Scholar and Professor, Dept. Wildlife Ecology and Conservation. 

Dr. Fred Van Dyke, Executive Director of the Au Sable Institute has known Ben since he was a student at Wheaton College where Fred was then the Chair of the Biology Department. Now, as a colleague and friend, Fred said of Ben,

"Ben Lowe has guided the Board through many difficult issues and the Institute through some tough times. His leadership is often so skillful and well planned that you don’t actually notice he’s leading, but you always end up in the right place because he knew where we needed to go. And with these accomplishments, Ben has remained a great encouragement to me, and his personal support has kept me going in solving tough problems which have faced Au Sable in the last five years."

Fellow Au Sable Board Member Dr. Dorothy Boorse of Gordon College says of her time knowing Ben,

"I have so appreciated all of Ben’s work as Board Chair. He has been committed to increasing the Board, moving the Institute forward, and creating a strong, welcoming community of scholars at the Au Sable Institute. I have appreciated his humor, courage and perseverance and am sorry he is leaving us!"

Founding Trustee on Au Sable's Board, Bert Froysland, has been a part of Au Sable since the early 1960s. He came to know Ben well through their shared years on the Board. Bert noted,

"It is impossible to overstate Ben Lowe's contributions to Au Sable as a Board Member and as Board Chair. During his tenure, Au Sable faced many thorny problems and his wisdom was profoundly valuable. As Board Chair his leadership style was marked by patience and deference to all points of view, yet in the end leading the Board to a good decision. As a person, Ben is humble, kind, and committed to serving the Lord."

Through the years, Ben Lowe has embodied the mission and vision of Au Sable through his words and actions. His leadership has been one of endurance and steadfast wisdom, Ben leaves Au Sable as an Institute that is blessed and better off because of his presence and efforts. As Ben begins a new season of life, he leaves Au Sable’s Board with kindness and optimism,

"I'm deeply grateful for these past six years of service at Au Sable. We've made a lot of progress together during this time: our mission, vision, and values have been renewed, enrollment has increased, participating colleges are participating more, finances continue to improve, The Pacific Rim Institute has been successfully launched, strategic new courses are being brought online, the research program is thriving, the Environmental Education Program is being reinvigorated, significant investments are being made to our campus, our community of alumni, friends, and colleagues continues to grow and bear fruit, and so much more (a lot of it behind the scenes but no less valuable!). All of this has surely been a team effort from across the Au Sable family, and I'm particularly grateful for the prayerful and persevering leadership of Dr. Fred Van Dyke and our beloved staff. No one has worked harder or more effectively than they have.


While I look forward to remaining an active part of the Au Sable family, I leave my current role as Trustee and Board Chair with a full and joyful heart. God has truly been gracious to us, and this community has truly been gracious to me. There is much good work left to do, and some of it will be hard. But God is faithful, and I look forward in eager anticipation to how he will continue using Au Sable to transform people and to serve, protect, and restore his creation."

Ben, thank you for your work, your prayers and your time spent in service to the Au Sable Institute. May God bless you abundantly in your graduate school pursuits and all of your future endeavors. You are forever a part of the Au Sable family and we celebrate the opportunities God has brought into your life.

 

And God is able to make all grace abound to you, so that in all things at all times, having all that you need, you will abound in every good work.         

2 Corinthians 9:8  NIV

Disasters and Climate Change: Connecting the Dots

Ben Lowe

This post was originally published on Resilire Blog on June 20, 2016.

Photo Credit: By NASA Goddard Space Flight Center - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s, NASA Visible Earth: Great Barrier Reef (IotD ID 11269), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1806532

Photo Credit: By NASA Goddard Space Flight Center - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s, NASA Visible Earth: Great Barrier Reef (IotD ID 11269), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1806532

"The integral links between disasters and climate change—and thus disaster ministry and climate action—are growing clearer every day.”

In early 2012, a group of concerned young Christian leaders came together in Washington, D.C., for two days of prayer and vision casting at the home of a senior leader in the World Evangelical Alliance.

Our concerns were twofold. First, we were getting reports from numerous relief and development organizations about how changing climate patterns were undoing their progress in helping communities secure clean water, dependable food supplies, and stable environments in order to sustain their livelihoods. Second, when we looked to our churches, campuses, and communities in the United States to see what was being done about this growing challenge, we found very little.

Prayerfully, we came to see that climate change is growing into a diverse and far-reaching humanitarian crisis, rendering many communities less resilient and undermining our ability to flourish together on God’s earth. Rising sea levels, acidifying oceans, failing crops, worsening extreme weather events, and other climate changes are increasingly wreaking havoc on both human and nonhuman communities around the world. As Christ followers called to love God, love our neighbor, and care for creation, we felt called to take greater responsibility for the world we are inheriting—and so, Young Evangelicals for Climate Action (Y.E.C.A.) was born.

At first glance, some may view Y.E.C.A. as an “environmental” initiative focused on “environmental” action and advocacy. In reality, however, we work just as much with relief and development agencies, mission organizations, and justice and compassion ministries as we do with traditional environmental groups. This is because climate change, like many of the pressing challenges we face, has interconnected moral, spiritual, societal, and ecological roots and impacts that must be addressed holistically in order to achieve lasting progress.

One partner that we are very grateful for and always eager to support and collaborate with is the Humanitarian Disaster Institute (HDI) at Wheaton College. HDI is at the forefront of equipping Christians and churches to more faithfully prepare for and respond to disasters in all their forms and at every level. Together, we are working to highlight the reality that, to reduce the frequency and severity of disasters, we need to tackle their roots, which include climate change. Likewise, if we want to help communities grow more resilient to disasters, we need to ensure that their natural resource base is healthy, stable, and sustainably utilized.

The integral links between disasters and climate change—and thus disaster ministry and climate action—are growing clearer every day. The more we are able to connect these dots in our action and advocacy, the more faithful we can live and love in a disaster-filled world.

For more on the links between disasters and climate change:

Earth Day, Christians, and the Mission of God

Ben Lowe

This post was originally published in CAMA Services Blog on April 20, 2016.

“When the environment isn’t healthy, people aren’t healthy.”

Standing on the shores of Lake Tanganyika in East Africa, I again recalled this lesson from one of my Wheaton College professors years ago. The second deepest lake in the world, Lake Tanganyika sustains a vital fishery that communities in the D.R. Congo, Tanzania, Zambia, and Burundi rely on to survive.

Tragically, a potent combination of changing climate patterns, unsustainable fishing practices, and other anthropogenic factors have been undercutting the lake’s productivity. Struggling to catch enough fish, people are losing their livelihoods, families are going hungry, and children are being pulled out of school to work.

Similarly tragic socio-ecological crises are happening across the world. I’ve seen them firsthand in Sub-Saharan Africa, as well as in Southeast Asia where I grew up as a missionary kid. They even occur in more developed countries like the United States (e.g. Flint, Michigan).

As our numbers and consumption rates continue climbing, how can we flourish together on God’s earth without further destroying it or each other?

It begins by realizing that our socio-environmental problems such as pollution, resource shortages, and forced migrations are symptoms of deeper moral ills. We live in a corrupted world and the brokenness that runs deep in creation plagues our societies and each of us as individuals.

At the end of the day, what all of creation needs is a solution to sin. And there is only one solution: Jesus Christ and his sacrifice and triumph on the cross. He overcame sin and death and paved the way for all things to be restored to wholeness (Colossians 1:15-20). Sometimes we Christians have been guilty of suggesting that Jesus came only to save people but, in the words of a good friend, “the cross is for allof the Fall.”

The Lausanne Movement puts it this way in their 2010 Cape Town Commitment:

We remind ourselves that the Bible declares God’s redemptive purpose for creation itself. Integral mission means discerning, proclaiming, and living out the biblical truth that the gospel is God’s good news, through the cross and resurrection of Jesus Christ, for individual persons, and for society, and for creation. All three are broken and suffering because of sin; all three are included in the redeeming love and mission of God; all three must be part of the comprehensive mission of God’s people.

Three implications stand out here:

First, creation matters. That God took on human flesh and came to live as one of us on earth reinforces the consistent biblical testimony that the physical creation is good. It has intrinsic value for the ultimate reason that God says so (Genesis 1). As something of such value, we as God’s people have every reason to steward and protect this creation.

Second, there is hope for both us and the earth. The Bible begins with creation and ends with new creation. We read that the earth will, like us, be set free from its groaning and oppression to sin (Romans 8). The biblical vision we have of the future is one where, by the love and power of God, creation will be refined and renewed. Human civilization and the natural world will once again flourish in a rich and peaceful relationship with each other and God (Revelation 22).

And, third, we get to be active participants in this redemptive mission of God. Humans are distinct from all the other species in that we are created in His image (Genesis 1). This is a functional distinction that gives us both the unique capacity as well as divine authority to join God in cultivating creation and developing culture (Genesis 2:15). Our calling is not merely to help sustain creation but to provide for its growth and flourishing.

These are not just abstract ideas. As I lament the social and ecological damage taking place on beautiful Lake Tanganyika, I am reminded that it does not need to be this way. And one day it won’t be. We can even now be part of caring for and restoring the people and places around us.

As I reflect on the future of Lake Tanganyika—and the future of the rest of creation —it is my faith in our Creator that gives me hope and moves me to care and act. The world celebrates Earth Day every April 22. For Christians, however, every day can and should be Earth Day—for the earth and everything in it belongs to God, and we follow a risen savior, Jesus Christ, who invites us to join Him in making all things new.

Back on Lake Tanganyika!

Ben Lowe

Fishing boats on the shore of Lake Tanganyika

Fishing boats on the shore of Lake Tanganyika

Lake Tanganyika was were I first encountered the growing impacts of climate change. I spent the summer of 2006 there as part of an NSF funded research project where my focus was on the littoral fishery. Nearly a decade later, I had the opportunity to return to the bustling Tanzanian port city of Kigoma. I was back to participate in the annual meeting for CLEAT – an international research project funded by DANIDA to study the declining fishery on Lake Tanganyika.

It was surreal but great to be back at the Tanzanian Fisheries Research Institute (Kigoma Center). Dr. Ishmael Kimirei was my research mentor out here in 2006 and he now serves as the Center Director. It was also great to see fellow Team Shombo members Anthony Kalangali and Huruma Mgana, and to find a new good friend in Albogast Aman, TAFIRI’s media/technology staffer.

Snorkeling with Amani at Jakobsen's beach

Snorkeling with Amani at Jakobsen's beach

Much of the first week in Kigoma was spent with Gideon Bulengela (PhD student at the University of Dar es Salaam) and Dr. Joan Brehm (sociologist from Illinois State University) visiting landing beaches to interview fishermen, BMU members, and fishery officials. It was an eye-opening time as we learned more about the challenges fishermen are facing today, which include piracy, witchcraft/superstitions, illegal fishing, expanding ring net usage, and changes in the climate that is impacting the lake’s limnology and thus productivity.

Meeting with fisherfolk at a local village/beach management unit

Meeting with fisherfolk at a local village/beach management unit

The second week was focused on meetings with the entire interdisciplinary CLEAT team to update on accomplishments from the first year and plan together for the year ahead. There are three Tanzanian PhD students in this project and four professors from the University of Dar es Salaam, and it was great to hear more about their work. We capped the meetings off with a well attended workshop for fishery stakeholders, which included local fishermen, fish processors, village leaders, and others. A few of us also met with staff at the nearby Tuunganne project, which is doing very encouraging work with fishing villages down south around the Mahale Mountains. 

CLEAT team meetings at TAFIRI-Kigoma

CLEAT team meetings at TAFIRI-Kigoma

Of course, in between things, I was able to fit in multiple snorkeling trips, excursions to the market, meetings with local missionaries, and many, many tasty snacks/meals of sambusas, chapatis,  chipsi mayai, and Stoney Tangawizi. On the last weekend, I also preached in the Kigoma church of the Tanzanian Assemblies of God, where Ishmael and his family worship. I was initially intimidated by the invitation, but everyone was very welcoming and it turned out to be a great joy and blessing. I look forward to the next visit!

With Dr. Ishmael Kimirei's family outside their church

With Dr. Ishmael Kimirei's family outside their church

Ordination Service

Ben Lowe

Ordination prayers led by church and community leaders

Ordination prayers led by church and community leaders

On February 24, 2016, I was ordained by the Christian and Missionary Alliance (Midwest District). This capped a valuable 2+ year denominational process of study and training and was held at my home church, the Wheaton Chinese Alliance Church (IL). Thanks to all who supported me throughout the process and participated in the service! Here are a some (fuzzy) photos from the event:

Preaching from Acts 16 to wrap up our series on Knowing the Will of God

Preaching from Acts 16 to wrap up our series on Knowing the Will of God

Rev. Dr. Rob Gallagher, our English pastor and my ordination mentor

Rev. Dr. Rob Gallagher, our English pastor and my ordination mentor

Rev. Jon Rich, the Midwest District Superintendent for the C&MA

Rev. Jon Rich, the Midwest District Superintendent for the C&MA

Prayers of the church

Prayers of the church

My parents came from Boston!

My parents came from Boston!

ordinationcertificate

Updates from Urbana 2015

Ben Lowe

One of two environment-related workshops at Urbana - over 300 in attendance here!

One of two environment-related workshops at Urbana - over 300 in attendance here!

Every three years InterVarsity Christian Fellowship holds their huge Urbana missions conference in St. Louis, MO. Two conferences ago, at Urbana 2009, we had a whole track on creation care, but interest seemed low, with only around 20-50 people at each of the sessions. This year, at Urbana 2015, I was asked to lead two workshops and was greatly encouraged by the much stronger turnout and many fruitful discussions. A sign of the growing concern and commitment among my generation to love our neighbors and care for God's world, which we are inheriting! Oh, and the IVP bookstore sold out of Green Revolution copies, which is a good problem to have :)

Thanks to all the friends and colleagues who helped, including Ben Bacheller at TEAM, Brittany Ederer at the Lausanne Creation Care Network, Phil Murphy at H.E.A.R.T., Kermit Hovey at Care of Creation, the OMF team, the Urbana Afternoon Program team, and many more. Here's more info on the two workshops:

New Frontiers in Missions - The Gospel Amidst Global Environmental Crises: Similar to the development of medical missions in the last century, environmental missions is a growing frontier with unique opportunities for service and witness at home and abroad. Come discuss biblical perspectives on environmental problems and explore their implications for missions and ministry today.

Making Sense of Climate Change - Questions, Solutions, and the Church’s Role: Climate change is a mounting injustice impacting communities across the world. It remains a polarizing and confusing issue in much of the American church. What's going on, what needs to be done, and how are Christians on the forefront of responding to this growing humanitarian and environmental crisis

YECA's 2015-2016 Fellows Training

Ben Lowe

Our 2015-2016 Fellows along with Dr. Fred Van Dyke and the Norregaards at Au Sable

Our 2015-2016 Fellows along with Dr. Fred Van Dyke and the Norregaards at Au Sable

A new academic year means a new batch of Climate Fellows at YECA! The training retreat this year was held at the Au Sable Institute in beautiful northern lower Michigan. This year we have Climate Fellows from Wheaton College (IL), Northwestern University (IA), Malone University (OH), Houghton College (NY), and Greenville College (IL). Dr. Fred Van Dyke, Executive Director of Au Sable was very involved in this year's training and Eric and Joanne Norregaards provided the hospitality yet again with their wonderful care and cooking. Here are some photos:

Learning from Rev. Dr. Jim Ball via Skype. Jim is a senior advisor for YECA and has been a pioneer in the evangelical response to climate change for years, spearheading both the Evangelical Climate Initiative and the What Would Jesus Drive tour

Learning from Rev. Dr. Jim Ball via Skype. Jim is a senior advisor for YECA and has been a pioneer in the evangelical response to climate change for years, spearheading both the Evangelical Climate Initiative and the What Would Jesus Drive tour

Planning on Little Twin Lake

Planning on Little Twin Lake

Lots of great food and fellowship on the shores of Big Twin Lake thanks to the Norregaards!

Lots of great food and fellowship on the shores of Big Twin Lake thanks to the Norregaards!

Each Fellow presented their draft campus plans at the end of the retreat

Each Fellow presented their draft campus plans at the end of the retreat

Front Page of the New York Times!

Ben Lowe

Front Page of the New York Times, Sunday Edition, June 21, 2015

Front Page of the New York Times, Sunday Edition, June 21, 2015

The New York Times ran a story about faith communities responding to climate change and we made the front page! It features the work of Young Evangelicals for Climate Action as well as my experiences researching on Lake Tanganyika, Tanzania, that opened my eyes to the growing impacts of climate disruption.

The article continued on the inside.

The article continued on the inside.

The article can also be read online here: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/21/science/earth/for-faithful-social-justice-goals-demand-action-on-environment.html?_r=0

Thanks to NYT reporter Justin Gillis for covering our efforts here!

A Rocha Kenya Training

Ben Lowe

With our UCBC partners in the back of Kiboko (the pickup we used to get around)

With our UCBC partners in the back of Kiboko (the pickup we used to get around)

After the Lausanne Creation Care Consultation outside Nairobi, we spent a week with the UCBC team at Mwamba, A Rocha Kenya's field studies center on the coast. The UCBC delegation was made up of leaders from the staff, faculty, and students who are helping to spearhead creation care at UCBC and in the surrounding city of Beni. We were at Mwamba together to help provide a natural science training and develop a plan for engaging their campus and community further on issues of environmental stewardship and climate action. Here are some photos of our very rich and memorable time together:

Learning about how ecosystems work and are connected at Mida Creek

Learning about how ecosystems work and are connected at Mida Creek

Learning about conservation agriculture techniques

Learning about conservation agriculture techniques

Our YECA team - Jolie, Faden, and Diane from the UCBC Fellows and Rachel, Andrew, and I from the Steering Committee

Our YECA team - Jolie, Faden, and Diane from the UCBC Fellows and Rachel, Andrew, and I from the Steering Committee

Our tree planting ceremony and prayer time at the of the training

Our tree planting ceremony and prayer time at the of the training